Data Protection and Privacy Policy

This privacy policy sets out how English Heritage Trust uses and protects any information that you give when you use this website.

No information collected by us on this website will be sold, rented or loaned except as expressly stated in this Privacy Policy and consented to by you. All personal information given to us through this website will only be held and used with care and in accordance with this policy and the Data Protection Act 1998.

We will not collect any personal information about you, except where it is specifically and knowingly provided by you, for example when you register as a user of the website or request information or provide us with feedback on the website. When personal information is collected it may be used by us to corroborate your identity and to provide you with the services we offer through this website and to process and fulfil requests for information or advice as well as to further develop this website to be useful to you and enable us to provide further services on this website in the future. We may share non-personal aggregate statistics (group) data about visitors to this website, use and other traffic patterns with connected, or third parties.

We do not sell or share any information outside English Heritage about you as an individual user of this website unless you agree to us doing so. When you view this website by linking from another web page, English Heritage may store the name of that web page for the purposes of internal administration and analysis.

Cookies

When we provide services, we want to make them easy, useful and reliable. Where services are delivered on the internet, this sometimes involves placing small amounts of information on your device, for example, computer or mobile phone. These include small files known as cookies. They cannot be used to identify you personally. These pieces of information are used to improve services for you through, for example:

  • enabling a service to recognise your device so you don't have to give the same information several times during one task.

  • recognising that you may already have given a username and password so you don't need to do it for every web page requested.

  • measuring how many people are using services, so they can be made easier to use and there's enough capacity to ensure they are fast.